Inclusion…does it work?

Wheelchair-Inclusion.jpgInclusion in schools is about no longer distinguishing between “general education” and “special education” programs.

At its most basic it means children with special needs join school in mainstream classes, this does work for some children but for others it is proving difficult, not just for the child with special needs but for the other children that are in the classroom.

One lovely child I worked with when I was a LSA (Learning Support Assistant) in another school was a wheelchair user, had autism, physical disabilities and a chronic disease. He was a bright child with a wicked sense of humour, however his special needs would cause to shout out loudly in class, to break wind and disrupt the teaching.

We also caused disruptions by going out of class to do some exercise every 15 minutes. It was at this point that the teacher would more than likely ask me to keep him out because of the disruption caused on the during the lesson.

It saddened me to see the upset caused to the child, teacher and the class, it is clearly unfair on all parties. This happened in every lesson and the teacher was exasperated with whole situation, sadly though this is not an uncommon occurrence.

Teachers have enough on their hands with the differentiation (that means tailoring instruction to meet individual needs. Whether teachers differentiate content, process, products, or the learning environment, the use of ongoing assessment and flexible grouping makes this a successful approach to planning and instruction) within any class.

Each school will have a SENCO (SENCO stands for “Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator”. A SENCO is responsible for the day-to-day operation of the school’s SEN policy. All mainstream schools must appoint a teacher to be their SENCO) whose job it is to help the children follow interventions and other work that has been decided on an IEP (Individual Education Plan is a plan or programme designed for children with SEN to help them to get the most out of their education) between child psychologists, parents, teachers and the school SENCO.

Each child is different and the programme can be very involved, and for the teaching assistant it will be a major part of your role and with 30 children in a class time is at a premium and with school cuts the number of teaching assistant is dropping.

If there are three or four children in one class with SEN and the Teaching Assistant is only employed for four hours a day is it really possible to do all that is required?

So does inclusion work? Inclusion in principle is a great idea as we live in a world where people are very different and it is lovely children just accept how people are.

However, children are individuals so the solution needs to be individual. There are numerous examples of children with SEN who have successfully integrated in mainstream schools which has been a benefit to both themselves and their peers.

On the other hand if it is not working with a particular child who exactly is it benefiting? Not the child, the class or the school, maybe we need to find specialist help for those who cannot integrate because surely if we don’t we are letting them down?

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